Return to Forum

Collective Contexts

Colloquy Collective

Joined:
Jun 2013
Posts:
3

Original Post

Forum Event
Event Time:
Mar 18-May 27 2014
Posted on:
March 14, 2014
Posted in:
Events

WELCOME TO COLLECTIVE CONTEXTS, A BRIDGE BETWEEN THE AUDIENCE AND THE WORK.

Bi-weekly we will meet to discuss a different play, its themes, and its connections to our lives and experiences.

At A Glance:

Cost: $20 including books; $10 without.

When: Tuesday Evenings, 7:30pm - 9:30pm 

3/18*, 4/1, 4/15, 4/29, 5/13, and 5/27

Where: The New York Foundation for the Arts

(20 Jay Street - Suite 740; Brooklyn, NY 11201)

*FREE Opening Session and Reception

At our opening session you will be able choose what will be the theme and plays. It will be also be a great time to meet Colloquy Collective and the other participants! Light refreshments will be provided.  

Click here to RSVP: http://bit.ly/1eKAMKq or just come to the first session!

WE’RE GOING TO CREATE A SPACE FOR THOUGHT, INCLUSION, AND EXPOSURE. WITH POTENTIAL TOPICS LIKE: 

Women and Relationships

Portia dresses as a man; an African harem holding a secret; a single kiss: the inextricable link between woman and womb is both divisive and empowering. How can a lady stay on top without being pulled under? Is sex a proxy for love? Why are there still so many questions? Help us examine crucial works that detail and expand woman.

Elemental

When a play is written, many factors correlate-- space, timeliness, support. Although most writers do not clutter their process by thinking about the best route to production, included stage directions and character development are enhanced, examined, and enriched by the process.

Men and Sexuality

To be a man you must be X. The emotional journeys of men are varied, however, and cannot always be directly mapped. When it comes to sex and the heart, the men in these plays are even more unchained. This session hopes to explore the age-old question-- what does it take to be a man?

Checkered

The POV of any play is important; it makes the play; it is the play. What does a play about Blacks look like by a Caucasian writer and vice versa? Let’s examine the nuances of a play about one group written by another. What are the assumptions, realities, and hopes the play presents. In the end, is race even pertinent after a point?

 

Log-in to :