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Tyrone Tysin Brown-Osborne

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Tyrone Brown-Osborne is an arts activist, teaching artist, writer, portrait photographer and multimedia artist. His work investigates the challenges people face in forming and maintaining their individuality while embracing their non-conformity.

His portraits integrate the subtle nuances that arise between subject and environment, allowing the picture to achieve a seamless authenticity. Tyrone has photographed notable choreographers, musicians and designers His work has been featured in The Village Voice, Philadelphia Style, Vogue online, Trace, The Source, The Fader, and other media outlets.
In 2005 he was co-curator of Black at Local Project in Queens, NY and received a Puffin Foundation grant that year as curator for Fire in the Belly: Free Expression & Individualism, an exhibit dedicated to exploring the aesthetic parallels between painting, photography and video. His directorial debut, The Wonder of Lilies, unifies his multiple disciplines in an experimental montage that contests stereotypical notions about beauty, power and violence.

His photographic and video work has been exhibited internationally at the University of Cambridge, Photoville, Capla/Kesting Gallery, The Time/Life Gallery, MOCADA, and The International Center of Photography. Currently Tyrone has partnered with longtime friend and artist Rhasaan Oyasaba Manning to produce 21 MISSING, a multi-disciplinary effort to address the history of the use of excessive force.

His distinctive portrait style integrates subtle nuances that arise between subject and environment, allowing the picture to achieve a seamless authenticity. Tyrone has photographed notable choreographer Tina Brown, musicians Bilal Oliver, John Legend and Kanye West. His work has been featured in The Village Voice, Philadelphia Style, Frank 151, American Vogue online, Trace, The Source, The Fader, and other media outlets.
In 2005 he was co-curator of Black at Local Project in Queens, NY and received a Puffin Foundation grant that year as curator for Fire in the Belly: Free Expression & Individualism, an exhibit dedicated to exploring the aesthetic parallels between painting, photography and video. His directorial debut, The Wonder of Lilies, unifies his multiple disciplines in an experimental montage that contests stereotypical notions about beauty, power and violence.

His photographic and video work has been exhibited internationally at the University of Cambridge, Photoville, Capla/Kesting Gallery, The Time/Life Gallery, MOCADA, and The International Center of Photography. Currently Tyrone has partnered with longtime friend and artist Rhasaan Oyasaba Manning to produce 21 MISSING, a multi-disciplinary effort to address the history of the use of excessive force.
His distinctive portraits integrate subtle nuances which arise between subject and environment, allowing the picture to achieve a seamless vitality. Tyrone has photographed notable choreographer Tina Brown, musicians Bilal Oliver, John Legend and Kanye West. His work has been featured in The Village Voice, Philadelphia Style, Frank 151, American Vogue online, Trace, The Source, The Fader, and other media outlets.
In 2005 he was co-curator of Black at Local Project in Queens, NY and received a Puffin Foundation grant that year as curator for Fire in the Belly: Free Expression & Individualism, an exhibit dedicated to exploring the aesthetic parallels between painting, photography and video. His directorial debut, The Wonder of Lilies, unifies his multiple disciplines in an experimental montage that contests stereotypical notions about beauty, power and violence.

His photographic and video work has been exhibited internationally at the University of Cambridge, Photoville, Capla/Kesting Gallery, The Time/Life Gallery, MOCADA, and The International Center of Photography. Currently Tyrone has partnered with longtime friend and artist Rhasaan Oyasaba Manning to produce 21 MISSING, a multi-disciplinary effort to address the history of the use of excessive force.

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