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Joseph Carlton Grant

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A native of Trinidad & Tobago, Artist Joseph C. Grant, Jr., grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn, New York and is the youngest of 11 children. Creative and talented at a young age, he attended New York’s High School of Art & Design where he studied Art, Photography, and Media Production. After attending New York Technical College for marketing, he would eventually return to his love of Fine Art.

As a young man, Joseph was deeply influenced by the works of Ernie Barnes and Norman Rockwell. Today, his hallmark is fanciful, elongated figures with exaggerated hands and feet. His unique approach to the human form embodies sports figures, Jazz themes, dancers and images reminiscent, of his childhood in Brooklyn. Although skilled in various mediums, it is Joseph’s use of acrylics and oils, mixed with his vivid imagination that makes this body of work an insightful and colorful depiction of life in the inner city.

The energetic movement in his works and his unique interpretation of the human form has been attributed to his many years as a dancer and football player.

Numerous Art Collectors, including comedian Bill Cosby, “Like It Is” founder and TV host, the late Gil Nobel and NBA, Detroit Piston’s All Star, Isiah Thomas have all acquired paintings from this enchanting body of work.

In addition to being an accomplished artist, Joseph is also a respected author and filmmaker, a magazine publisher, and a youth mentor. In 2007 Joseph founded the Arts To Literacy Initiative. Through his innovative Arts To Literacy programs, Joseph continues to teach filmmaking, self-publishing, as well as art, to at risk children of all ages throughout Brooklyn and Miami.

Over the years, Joseph has received considerable press and media attention for his Fine Arts and Community works. He has been the recipient of numerous commissions and awards.

Currently Joseph is creating an artistic retrospective of the historical black firemen of America, spanning from the 1800’s to the present, titled “We Didn’t Start The Fire.”

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