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Carolina S Salguero

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Carolina Salguero lives a mixed media life of photography, writing, oral history, waterfront planning & happenings. She is a Brooklyn patriot living on a ship.
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Her photography has moody light, energy, frequent sparks of humor and a keen insight into the emotional lives of her subjects. Her photography has won numerous awards and is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum, the Musee de l'Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland, the Akron Art Museum and Rutgers University. On the basis of her 9/11 work, she was nominated for ICP's Photojournalist of the year award by Kathy Ryan, Photo Editor of the New York Times Sunday Magazine.
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From 1989 to 1997, Carolina Salguero worked as a documentary photographer producing in-depth photo essays (mostly overseas) as well as incisive portraits of New York area artists on assignment.
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Once resettled in NYC in 1997, the city's waterfront became her focus. She is attracted to it as both beautiful, evocative physical space and as a major urban planning issue.
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Her interest in those issues prompted her to found a non-profit organization PortSide NewYork whose programs are all waterfront-related.
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Since summer 2007, she has been living on a historic ship, the retired, coastal oil tanker MARY A. WHALEN, the home of PortSide NewYork, the world's only oil tanker cultural center, and is working on a portfolio of photographic views of NYC seen through the MARY A. WHALEN portholes.

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